LYNN LICK RUN

Agent Contact:
Neal Roth, 304.667.3794

OVERVIEW

Lynn Lick Run is 28.42 acres and designated Lot#28, of Phase 3, in the planned development of the Overlook @ Greenbrier. Easy access on a private gated road with great views across the valley below.  Five minutes to the 5000 acre Greenbrier State Forest, 25 minutes to the Greenbrier River and 25 minutes to the front gates of the world famous Greenbrier Resort.

Protective Covenants are in place and an active Property Owners Association keeps the development in tip top condition.

There is an excellent building spot on the top of the mountain with long range views of the valley below and the sweeping mountains in the distance. It’s very quiet and tons of stars can be viewed in the night sky.

THE OVERLOOK AT THE GREENBRIER

The Overlook at Greenbrier is located in Greenbrier County, West Virginia; a 4,000 acre community nestled in the Allegheny Mountains, adjacent to the Greenbrier State Forest and is minutes from the Greenbrier Resort and the towns of Lewisburg and White Sulphur Springs. The community is conveniently located within 6 miles of Interstate 64 and the White Sulphur Springs Amtrak Station and 16 miles from the Greenbrier Valley Airport.

The Overlook at Greenbrier community is made up of over 90 large acreage lots ranging from 20 to 350 acres. Elevations range from 1,900 to 3,300 feet. Besides magnificent views, beautiful forests and streams, our community is home to abundant wildlife. All property owners within the community belong to the Overlook at Greenbrier Property Owners Association which maintains the five gates and 20 miles of shale based roads that serve the community.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 28.42-acre classic multiple-use parcel located in historic Greenbrier County
  • Network of interior roads and trails provide access to nearly every corner
  • Known for its abundant and diverse wildlife population
  • Nearby is the Greenbrier River – perfect for anglers and water recreation enthusiasts
  • Spectacular long-range views approaching 10 miles
  • Elevations range from 1,960 ft. to 2,211 ft.
  • Future residential home or cabin sites
  • Electric and phone at the property line
  • Low population density, little or no light pollution
  • Darkest of night skies for planet observation, stargazing and astrophotography
  • Blueline stream flowing through the property
  • Ferns, songbirds, frogs, turtles, crawdads all enjoy the stream
  • Located in ever popular Greenbrier County
  • Timber species include, oaks, walnut, poplar, maple, white pine, hemlock and hickories
  • Forest is a tremendous producer of life-giving Oxygen and a major sequester of carbon
  • Private POA maintained road for superior access
  • Near the Greenbrier State Forest
  • 30 minutes to the Greenbrier River
  • 40 minutes to the Greenbrier Resort
  • 40 minutes to Greenbrier Valley Airport with jet service

LOCATION

Google Coordinates: 37.738262°(N), -80.363681°(W)
Address: Oak Ridge Road, Caldwell, WV 24925. No 911 address is assigned to property without structures.
Elevation Range: 1960 ft. to 2211 ft. +/-

WATER

A blue line stream appears to cross the northern side of the property for nearly 2/10 mile. There should be regular water flow, especially during rain events and snow melt.

MINERAL RESOURCES

West Virginia is one of the states in the US that has two ownership titles, those being SURFACE RIGHTS and MINERAL RIGHTS. A title search for mineral rights ownership has not been conducted. All rights the owner has will convey with the property. A mineral title search could be conducted by a title attorney at the same time when the surface title search is being conducted.

BOUNDARIES AND SURVEY

The property was surveyed in 2005 as part of a subdivision and is shown on a recorded survey plat. The property is being sold by the boundary and not by the acre.

UTILITIES

Water: Water well can be drilled
Sewer: Private septic system can be installed
Electricity: At the property line
Telephone: At the property line
Internet: Possible through telephone cable, Satellite or Cell phone
Cellphone Coverage: Excellent with 4G

ACCESS/FRONTAGE

The property may be accessed by Harts Run Road (CR 60/14) through the Greenbrier State Forest to Pine Ridge Way (private).  The property lies behind a locked gate.  The property is located at the end of and along Oak Ridge Road (private)..

ZONING

Greenbrier County is subject to some zoning and subdivision regulations. All prospective buyers should consult the County Commission and also the Health Department for details regarding zoning, building codes and installation of septic systems.
Information can be found at the county website: http://greenbriercounty.net/ordinances.

Overlook at Greenbrier is a private gated community with a Property Owner Association.  Information may be found for the Overlook at Greenbrier website: http://overlookatgreenbrier.org

PROPERTY TYPE/USE SUMMARY

The property is currently forestland.

(This summary is an estimation of current property use as determined from aerial photography. It is made subject to the estimation of property boundaries and any errors in the interpretation of land use type from the aerial photography utilized.)

DEED AND TAX INFORMATION

Deed Information: DB 518 Pg. 392
Greenbrier County, West Virginia

Acreage: 28.42 acres +/-
Real Estate Tax ID/Acreage/Taxes:

Greenbrier County (13), West Virginia
White Sulphur District (16)

Tax Map 34 Parcel 6; Class 3

2020 Real Estate Taxes: $451.76

SCHOOLS

Greenbrier County School District

Public Elementary School:
White Sulphur Elementary School

Public Middle School:
Eastern Greenbrier Middle School

Public High School:
Greenbrier East High School

Colleges:
New River Community and Technical College (Lewisburg campus)
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

Private Schools:
Greenbrier Community School (PK-8)
Greenbrier Valley Academy (2-8)
Lewisburg Baptist Academy (PK-12)
Renick Christian School (2-7)
Seneca Trail Christian Academy (PK-12)

SURROUNDING AREA

RECREATION

The property offers unparalleled recreational opportunities. Numerous recreational activities are anchored by the nearby Greenbrier River, New River, New River Gorge National Park and the 2000-acre Bluestone Lake in West Virginia and the Jackson River, James River and Lake Moomaw in Virginia.

Cold Water Fishing can be found throughout the region. Many of the tributaries of the Greenbrier River are stocked with trout. The head waters hold the native Brook Trout. Several special regulation sections of some streams offer fly-fishing only areas. The Cranberry Back-Country area hosts 16 miles of secluded trout fishing and may only be accessed by non-motorized transportation.  The Jackson River above and below Lake Moomaw is stocked and has some reproducing populations of Brook, Rainbow and Brown trout in the upper river area.

Warm Water Fishing in the Greenbrier River, New River, Jackson River and James River are some of the best in the region. Smallmouth bass and muskie are the big draws. The Greenbrier Jackson and James Rivers are great for the novice kayaker or canoeist to fish, the New River is for the more experience boaters only but has the best fishing for trophy sized fish. The New River has an excellent population of the native Eastern Highlands walleye. This walleye subspecies grows faster and produce quicker than their northern cousins. Great fishing is found on both rivers for crappie, catfish, pike and bluegill.

Water-sports enthusiasts will find the nearby rivers and lakes are ideal for swimming, canoeing, fishing, kayaking, tubing, snorkeling, paddle boarding and windsurfing.

Nature viewing is next in line of recreational activities. Wildlife viewing is not just for larger animals. Equal consideration is given to a diversity of species including neo-tropical songbirds, butterflies, turtles, frogs, rabbits, chipmunks, dragonflies, owls, eagles and hawks. White tail deer, black bear, red/gray fox, bobcat, wild turkey, grouse, geese, squirrel, raccoon, fox and rabbit make up the resident wildlife population.

Stargazing-Planet Observation
Near total darkness can be still be found on the property, thereby affording the opportunity to view the night sky in all its brilliant wonder.

All Terrain Motorsports
Experience the property from an ATV or UTV. Riders are welcome to ride all public roads that do not have a painted dividing line and there are miles and miles of open roads in the area. These exciting machines handle the wide variety of the forest’s terrain. Please check WV DMV regulations.

Dirt bikes can also be a lot of fun and they come in all sizes and horsepower to fit anyone who enjoys being on two wheels.

Mountain Biking and Hiking
The land may be used for mountain biking or hiking and the area offers several state and national parks geared for these activities.

Rock Climbing on the Meadow and New Rivers
183 routes with opportunities for easier traditional routes as well as hard sport routes and some mixed routes as well.

WILDLIFE

The nearby Meadow River, New River, Greenbrier River, and Bluestone Lake in West Virginia, the Jackson River, James River and Lake Moomaw in Virginia are major contributors to the local ecosystem richness and diversity for both plants and animals. There are many animals that live year round and at other times in the water and around the edges of the rivers/lake, including beavers, otters, minks, raccoons, opossums, blue herons, Canada geese, wood ducks, mallards, king fishers, minnows, native fish, turtles, salamanders, newts, crayfish, muskrats, bull frogs, eagles, owls, hawks and redwing blackbirds.

The miles of “edge effect” benefit all the resident wildlife. In addition to those listed above, white tail deer, black bear, wild turkey, squirrel, rabbit, bobcat, fox, and chipmunk, make up the resident wildlife population.

Area winged wildlife includes Neotropical songbirds, turkey, grouse, eagles, herons, hawks, woodcock, owls, ravens, king fishers, ravens, crows, ground nesters, and hummingbirds and many types of waterfowl

Of equal importance, there is the insect and microscopic world including butterflies, dragonflies, water skaters, water beetles, damselflies, hellgrammites, tadpoles and various insect larvae.

Great fishing is found in the Meadow River, Greenbrier River, New River and Bluestone Lake in West Virginia and the Jackson and James Rivers in Virginia with small and large mouth bass, crappie, catfish, muskie, walleye, pike and bluegill present in good numbers.

The rivers, lake, and creeks, and their surrounding aquatic plant life, create a water a water-supported community with a wide variety of wildlife. Much of their margins are fringed by wetlands, and these wetlands support the aquatic food web, provide shelter for wildlife, and stabilize their shores. The plant life associated with the wetland includes rushes, sedges, cattails, duckweed, bee balm and algae.

The hardwood forest of the surrounding mountains provides the essential nutrient source and produces tons of hard mast including acorns, hickory nuts, beech nuts and black walnuts. Soft mast includes stag horn sumac, black cherry, tulip poplar seeds, maple seeds, autumn olive berries and blackberries.

FOREST FARMING

The most common crops are medicinal herbs and mushrooms. Other crops that can be produced include shade-loving native ornamentals, moss, fruit, nuts, other food crops, and decorative materials for crafts. These crops are often referred to as special forest products.

Here are some specific examples of possible crops:

  • Medicinal herbs: Ginseng, goldenseal, black cohosh, bloodroot, passionflower, and mayapple
  • Mushrooms: Shiitake and oyster mushrooms
  • Native ornamentals: Rhododendrons and dogwood
  • Moss: Log or sheet moss
  • Fruit: Pawpaws, currants, elderberries, and lowbush blueberries
  • Nuts: Black walnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, and beechnuts
  • Other food crops: Ramps (wild leeks), maple syrup, and honey

Plants used for decorative purposes, dyes, and crafts: Galax, princess pine, white oak, pussy willow branches in the spring, holly, bittersweet, and bloodroot and ground pine (Lycopodium)

FOREST/TIMBER RESOURCES

The timber resource is well positioned for future timber income over the coming decades. The 28.42+/- acre forest has trees in the 15 to 100+ year-old range. The forest resource is composed of upland Appalachian hardwoods and softwood species. The species composition consists primarily of White Pine, Poplar, Red Oak, White Oak and Hickory.

The forest floor is home to several types of mushrooms, medicinal plants, wild ginseng, ferns and cool green mosses.

THE AREA

Lynn Lick Run is an easy drive to higher population areas of Charleston, Charlottesville, Roanoke, Blacksburg, Beckley, White Sulphur Springs and Lewisburg.

 Historic Greenbrier County
Lewisburg, which is the Greenbrier County seat, was voted the Coolest Small Town in America, combining the warmth of a close community with the sophistication of more urban locations. The thriving downtown historic district offers year-round live productions presented at the State Professional Theatre of WV, Carnegie Hall, distinctive dining venues, antique shops, award-winning galleries/boutiques, a year-round farmer’s markets.

Greenbrier Valley Medical Center is a modern hospital and all attendant medical facilities, along with the many big box stores.

Lewisburg is also home to the modern Robert. C Byrd Medical Clinic (300 employees), the WV Osteopathic Medical School (600 students) and the New River Community and Technical College. The area is a strong economic generator with a solid workforce employed in county/state government, tourism, hospitality, medical, education, retail, construction, wood products, mining and agriculture.

The world-renowned Greenbrier Resort, with 800 rooms and 1600 employees, is located in the sleepy little town of White Sulphur Springs. The 4-Star resort has a subterranean casino and is home to the PGA tour, the “Greenbrier Classic.” Several other area golf courses are available in the area – including Oakhurst Links, America’s first golf course, where guests play using old style hickory-handled clubs and ground-burrowing golf balls.

A picturesque train ride from White Sulphur Springs connects the area to DC, Philadelphia, Chicago, and many other locations. By car, DC is 4 hours away and Charlotte is only 4.

Charleston is West Virginia’s state capitol (2 hours). Charleston is West Virginia’s largest city with a population of some 50,000 and a metro area of 225,000. It is the center of government, commerce, culture and industry. There is a commercial airport with daily flights to most major hubs.

Nearby interstates I-77, I-64 and I-81 offer easy access to Washington DC, Richmond, Charlotte, Pittsburgh, Charleston and Cincinnati.

The surrounding area offers unlimited recreational activities including white water rafting, golfing, fishing, camping, hiking, bird watching and rock climbing and snow skiing.

Highlights:

  • 20-90 min to Beckley, Princeton, Lewisburg, 80,000-acre New River Gorge National Park, 2,000-acre Bluestone Lake, Pipestem Resort and Bluestone State Park, Sandstone Falls, Snowshoe Ski Resort, Winterplace Ski Resort and the 4-Star Greenbrier Resort, 3000-acre Summersville Lake and 2500-acre Lake Moomaw
  • A picturesque Amtrak train ride from White Sulphur Springs connects the area to DC, Philadelphia, New York, Chicago, and many other locations
  • Washington, DC is 4 hours, Richmond is 3.5 hours and Charlotte 3 hours
  • Charleston (2 hr), Beckley (60 min), Lewisburg (30 min) airports offer jet service to major hubs
  • Charleston, the WV state capitol, and Charlottesville, VA are just over 2 hours’ drive and offer all large city amenities
  • Easy access to I-64, I-77, I-79, US 19, US 220
  • The Bechtel Summit Reserve, the12,000-acre Boy Scouts of America’s high adventure camp (90 min)
  • The 14,000-acre Bluestone Wildlife Management Area and New River Gorge National Park are 60 minutes
  • The 2,385-acre Meadow River Wildlife Management Area is 40 minutes
  • The 47,815-acre Cranberry Wilderness in the Monongahela National Forest is 90 minutes

THE GREENBRIER RIVER
The Greenbrier River possesses the excitement of life on one of the nation’s great wild rivers. The focus of a vast outdoor-recreation destination, it flows untamed out of the lofty Alleghenies, attracting anglers, paddlers, and naturalists from across the globe.

At 172 miles long, the Greenbrier drains over 1.5 million acres and is the longest undammed river left in the Eastern United States. It is primarily used for recreational pursuits and well known for its fishing, canoeing, kayaking and floating opportunities. Its upper reaches flow through the Monongahela National Forest, and it is paralleled for 77 miles by the Greenbrier River Trail, a rail trail which runs between the communities of Cass and North Caldwell.

It has always been a valuable water route, with the majority of the important cities in the watershed being established river ports. The river gives the receiving waters of the New River an estimated 30% of its water volume. Over three-fourths of the watershed is an extensive karstic (cavern system), which supports fine trout fishing, cave exploration and recreation. Many important festivals and public events are held along the river throughout the watershed.

The Greenbrier is formed at Durbin in northern Pocahontas County by the confluence of the East Fork Greenbrier River and the West Fork Greenbrier River, both of which are short streams rising at elevations exceeding 3,300 feet and flowing for their entire lengths in northern Pocahontas County. From Durbin the Greenbrier flows generally south-southwest through Pocahontas, Greenbrier and Summers Counties, past several communities including Cass, Marlinton, Hillsboro, Ronceverte, Fort Spring, Alderson, and Hinton, where it flows into the New River.

Along most of its course, the Greenbrier accommodated the celebrated Indian warpath known as the Seneca Trail (Great Indian Warpath). From the vicinity of present-day White Sulphur Springs, the Trail followed Anthony’s Creek down to the Greenbrier near the present Pocahontas-Greenbrier County line. It then ascended the River to the vicinity of Hillsboro and Droop Mountain and made its way through present Pocahontas County by way of future Marlinton, Indian Draft Run, and Edray.

GREENBRIER RIVER TRAIL
Lynn Lick Run is near the Greenbrier River Trail State Park. The 77-mile-long trail is operated by the West Virginia State Parks and is a former C&O railroad grade now used for hiking, bicycling, ski-touring, horseback-riding, and wheel-chair use. The trail passes through numerous small towns and traverses 35 bridges and 2 tunnels as it winds its way along the valley. Most of the trail is adjacent to the free-flowing Greenbrier River and is surrounded by peaks of the Allegheny Mountains.

THE NEW RIVER AND BLUESTONE LAKE
The property is located in the heart of the recreational mecca area and is 60 minutes to the New River, 80,000-acre New River Gorge National Park and the 2000-acre Bluestone Lake at Hinton. The New River Gorge was a vast and largely unsettled wilderness until the C&O railroad was built on the eastern side of the river in the 1880’s. The railroad opened up the rich coalfields and virgin timber stands of the region. Early “mountaineers” settled the area and soon were carving out mountain farms and raising families.

The New River is the second oldest river in the world, preceded only by the Nile; it is the oldest river in North America. The New River is unique because it begins in Blowing Rock, N.C. and flows north through Virginia into West Virginia. The Nile and Amazon are the only other major rivers that also flow north. Year after year, it produces more citation fish than any other warm water river in WV. Smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, crappie, catfish, sunfish, hybrid striped bass, and muskie are all common species of fish found in the New River and Bluestone Lake.

Bluestone Lake is over 2000 acres at summer pool and is the state’s third largest body of water. Great hunting and fishing opportunities abound at the 17,632-acre Bluestone Wildlife Area adjacent to the park and nearby Camp Creek State Forest.

CRANBERRY RIVER AND WILDERNESS AREA
The 47,815 acre Cranberry Wilderness and 14,000 acre Cranberry Backcountry in the Monongahela National Forest is part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Located in Pocahontas and Webster Counties, the area includes the entire drainage of the Middle Fork of the Williams and the North Fork of the Cranberry Rivers. Elevations range from 2,400 to over 4,600 feet.

Cranberry Wilderness and Cranberry Backcountry make up one of the largest backpacking areas east of the Mississippi River. Together there are 135 miles of hiking trails that provide a great opportunity of reasonably long distance trips (3 to 6 days) and some good loops. The scenery includes rugged mountains with streams, waterfalls and swimming holes. Hardwood forests dominate the lower elevations and spruce forests offer interesting variation on the peaks of the mountains.

CRANBERRY RIVER FLY FISHING
The Cranberry River is a confluence of its North and South Forks which rise on Black Mountain and Cranberry Mountain, respectively. In the past, naturally acidic water made the Cranberry River almost unlivable for warm water species. Thanks to the Department of Natural Resources’ addition of limestone to the water in recent years, the river’s PH levels have risen and its waters are now rife with wildlife, namely, trout. In fact, the Cranberry River holds more trout per acre than any other stream in West Virginia. The river consists of two sections; the easily accessible lower section and the remote backcountry section, which is the real crown jewel for anglers. Deep in the wilderness and unreachable by vehicles, the 16-mile backcountry section is well worth the hike. The Backcountry includes both the North and South forks as well as Dogway Fork, the river’s glorious 6-mile stretch designated for “Fly Fishing Only”. All three forks are excellent for brook trout fishing, but the backcountry section fosters plenty of rainbow and brown trout. It’s very likely you won’t be ready to head home after just one day, so check out the shelters available along the water for overnight trips. Glades Gate Google Map Coordinates: 38.208298, -80.282796

MEADOW RIVER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA
The Meadow River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) is owned by WVDNR and WVDOH and managed by WV Division of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Section. It was formerly known as the Meadow River Public Hunting & Fishing Area.

In the upper vale of the Meadow River, the 2,698-acre Meadow River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) ranges across wetlands and bottoms along the river and its tributaries and climbs gentle slopes into the surrounding Allegheny foothills.

Game traditionally associated with the management area includes deer, grouse, squirrel, raccoon, turkey, woodcock, and waterfowl. Other wildlife residents include Bobcat, Coyote, Red Fox, Beaver, Mink, Muskrat, Opossum, Fox

The Meadow River Wildlife Management area is located in western Greenbrier County five miles south of Rupert and 15 miles northwest of Lewisburg. The area is accessible from exits on expressway I-64 at Dawson, WV, or Sam Black Church, WV. Larger tracts are accessible off highway US-60 on Tommy Hall Road (CR-60/18) near Rupert.

LAKE MOOMAW
Lake Moomaw is among the most popular developed recreation areas in the George Washington National Forest and provides an endless array of activities including boating, fishing, hiking, biking and camping. The 2,500 acre lake is renowned for its excellent fishing yielding citation size brown and rainbow trout, as well as good bass, pan and crappie.

Lake Moomaw is the second largest impoundment in western Virginia. It covers 2,530 surface acres and has a maximum depth of 152 feet. The impoundment is “drawn down” between 10-15 feet annually, beginning slowly in June and reaching its lowest level usually by September. There are 43 miles of undeveloped, wooded shoreline. There are 5 U.S. Forest Service Campgrounds around the lake, 3 boat launches and a marina.

The Gathright Dam is a massive earthen structure that backs up the Jackson River for over 12 miles, forming Lake Moomaw. A U. S. Army Corps of Engineers project, Lake Moomaw was constructed for downstream flow augmentation (water quality), flood control, and recreation. The idea for a lake above the City of Covington was suggested just after World War II, but the project was not completed until the early 1980’s. The backwater of the Jackson River flooded acres of bottomland once owned by Thomas Gathright. The project was pushed forward by Covington businessman Benjamin Moomaw, after which the lake was named.

The reservoir is deep enough (152 feet) for both warm water fish (bass, catfish, sunfish, crappie) and coldwater fish (trout). The lake was stocked with thousands of largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish in 1980. The Jackson River was already home to wild populations of smallmouth bass, rock bass, and chain pickerel, so it was understood that these species would acclimate to their new surroundings. Black crappie and yellow perch were later additions to the fishery.

Lake Moomaw is also known for its trout fishery. A layer of cold, oxygenated water lies 15 feet below the surface. It is in this zone that stocked rainbow, brown, and brook trout thrive. Alewives, members of the herring family, were stocked in the early 1980’s in order to establish a plentiful food base for both trout and other predators. These small, silvery fish are truly the “backbone” of the lake’s sport fishery. They are abundant, ubiquitous, and, seemingly the prey of choice for trophy fish that are caught from Lake Moomaw.

Approximately 35,000 McConaughy and 35,000 brown trout finglerlings are stocked each year. Fingerlings switch to natural food quickly and reach quality size in a couple of years. Neither a trout license nor National Forest Stamp is required at Lake Moomaw. There are no boat motor restriction

JACKSON RIVER
The Jackson River is a major tributary of the James River in Virginia, flowing 96.4 miles. The James River is formed by the confluence of the Jackson River and the Cowpasture River.

The Jackson River rises in Highland County, Virginia, near the border of West Virginia. It flows south between Back Creek Mountain and Jack Mountain, entering Bath County, where it continues to flow south. The Jackson River is impounded by Gathright Dam in Alleghany County, creating Lake Moomaw. From the dam, Jackson River flows south and then east through Alleghany County, through the city of Covington and the town of Clifton Forge, before joining with the Cowpasture River to create the James River.

The river is named for the first European settler on its banks, William Jackson, who received a grant of 270 acres from King George II in 1750. Jackson was possibly an acquaintance of Alexander Dunlap, the first settler on the Cowpasture River.

REGIONAL INFORMATION