Skip to content

PERKINS FARM

266 multi-use acres containing fertile farm fields, valuable mature forest, diverse wildlife, forest trails and beautiful of streams. An unrivaled and exciting recreational and farming property. 1st time on the market since 1949.

Agent Contact:
Richard Grist, 304.646.8837

FEATURES AND BENEFITS

  • 1st time on market since 1949
  • 266 acres of diverse topography in a fascinating natural setting
  • Lewisburg, major retailers, restaurants, a hospital in 30-minutes’ drive on quiet roads
  • 110 +/- acres of flat to gently rolling pasture and cropland
  • 155 +/- acres of very valuable high-quality Appalachian hardwood timber
  • Long views of 4 distinct mountain ranges from all compass points
  • 1920’s Vintage farm house with tin roof, hardwood floors and heart pine moldings
  • Clear, cold mountain spring water serves the home with several other spring about
  • Very nice hunting camp set back in the woods
  • Winding forest trails accessing nearly every part of the property
  • Interesting moss-covered rock outcrops and rock cliffs
  • Fur bearing resident wildlife include deer, black bear, coyote, bobcat, squirrel, rabbit, raccoon and opossum
  • Water loving wildlife includes blue herons, wood ducks, mallards, Canada geese, turtles, bullfrogs, crayfish, muskrats, newts, and salamanders
  • Winged wildlife includes bald eagles, wild turkeys, grouse, neo-tropical song birds, woodpeckers, hawks, owls, ravens, and a large variety of other small birds
  • Positioned for developing a rewarding permaculture lifestyle
  • Culberson Creek, a blue-line stream, meanders through portions of the property
  • 20 ephemeral streams feed the larger streams during rain events and snow melt
  • Surrounded by large timber tracts and farms in a nice rural neighborhood
  • A quiet private farm lane provides access to paved state roads – FedEx delivery
  • Darkest of skies with little or no light pollution for star and planet gazing
  • Rich soil offers numerous spots for gardens and to grow hay and various crops
  • Native sedges, rushes, and ferns occupy the marsh land
  • Located in recreationally popular and culturally important Greenbrier County
  • Many very ancient “Heritage” trees scattered about estimated at 200-300 years old
  • Excellent timber species include fragrant cedar, oaks, black walnut, poplar, maples and hickories
  • All the mineral rights in title will convey by the owner
  • Certified organic land
  • Electricity and telephone onsite with cell phone and 4G available
  • Jet air service to Chicago O’Hare and Washington DC
  • Easy access to Interstates I-64, I-77, I-81 and I-79
  • Rock outcroppings for bouldering and free climbing
  • Miles of internal trails provides superior access to all corners of the property for hiking, horseback riding or ATV adventure
  • Cattle seasonally graze on the property and hay is cut and baled once or twice a year
  • Long hollows with numerous smaller ephemeral drains, high knobs, sinks, limestone outcrops and marshes make for interesting topographic relief
  • Wildlife abounds due to the perfect mix of field, forest, water and seclusion surrounded by large farms and timberland

LOCATION

Google Coordinates: 37.990901°(N), -80.430424°(W)
Address: Off Roy Ray Road, Renick, WV 24966
Elevation Range: 2174 ft. to 2397 ft. +/-

DIRECTIONS

From Lewisburg, West Virginia: 17.5 miles +/- (35 minutes +/-)

From the US 60 and US 219 intersection in Lewisburg, travel Route 219 North, passing through Frankford, for about 13.5 miles, take a left on the Butler Mountain Road (CR 17/1) and go 2 miles and bear right on the Red Horse Road (CR 219/3), travel about 1 mile to the T intersection and take a left on the Leonard Road (CR 9/1). Travel 4/10’s mile and take a right on Roy Ray Road, continue down the lane for 300 feet and bear right through the cattle guard and gate and follow the lane to the farm gate/cattle crossing and you have arrived at the property.

From Marlinton, West Virginia: 31.4 miles +/- (55 minutes +/-)

Travel to Renick; from the Renick Post Office travel RT 219 South for 2.2 miles; turn sharp right onto Butler Mountain Road (CR 17/1) and go 2 miles and bear right on the Red Horse Road (CR 219/3), travel about 1 mile to the T intersection and take a left on the Leonard Road (CR 9/1). Travel 4/10’s mile and take a right on Roy Ray Road, continue down the lane for 300 feet and bear right through the cattle guard and gate and follow the lane to the farm gate/cattle crossing and you have arrived at the property.

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES

The Perkins Farm is certified Organic. Its rich, well-drained soil, abundant water, 4-season climate, and gentle topography provide the necessary elements for a permaculture lifestyle. There are currently about 110 acres in fields that are suitable for hay or crops like corn, pumpkins, medicinal hemp, soybeans, oats, barley, flowers, vegetables (farm to table) etc.

The farm is currently being leased for cattle grazing and hay production.

There is considerable perimeter fencing and some cross fencing. Two small farm ponds provide water for resident wildlife and the livestock fencing is considered “cattle tight”.

There are several fruit trees scattered about, some of which were part of the early homestead. fenced. Crops of black walnuts and hickory nuts are produced each year from the abundant black walnut and hickory trees scattered about.

Honey bees would do well here, and it would be possible to produce maple syrup from the sugar and red maple trees growing on the property.

PROPERTY TYPE/USE SUMMARY

There is a vintage farm home, two barns, woodworking shop, machine shed with surrounding grounds, hay fields, pasture fields, wildlife food plots and mature forestland. A breakdown is as follows:

  • Home and Buildings Grounds: 1+/- acre
  • Forestland: 155 +/- acres
  • Pasture & Hay Fields: 110 +/- acres
  • 3 small farm ponds

(This summary is an estimation of current property use as determined from aerial photography. It is made subject to the estimation of property boundaries and any errors in the interpretation of land use type from the aerial photography utilized.)

ZONING

Greenbrier County is subject to some zoning and subdivision regulations. All prospective buyers should consult the County Commission and also the Health Department for details regarding zoning, building codes and installation of septic systems.
Information can be found at the county website: http://greenbriercounty.net/ordinances/

WATER RESOURCES

The property has an abundance of water resources, especially the cold water mountain spring that has supplied the home for about 100 years. There are several other springs scattered about on the property.

3 small farm ponds supply water for livestock and resident wildlife.

Culberson Creek is a major blue line stream maintaining live water for most of the year. An additional 20+ ephemeral streams flow during rain events and snow melt. The small streams feed to the stronger blue line Culberson Creek and then run downstream off the property several miles flowing both above ground and below ground through subterranean limestone caves emptying into the Greenbrier River; the water’s journey continues down-river to the New River, Kanawha, Ohio and finally to the mighty Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico.

CULBERSON CREEK

Culberson Creek is a major contributor to local ecosystem richness and diversity for both plants and animals.

The blue-line rocky stream with its surrounding aquatic plant life create a water supported community with a wide variety of wildlife. Some of stream is fringed by wetlands, and these wetlands support the aquatic food web, provide shelter for wildlife, and stabilize the stream bank. The plant life associated with the wetland includes rushes, sedges, cattails, duckweed and algae.

There are many animals that live in the water and around the edges of the creek including raccoons, opossums, blue herons, Canada geese, wood ducks, mallards, minnows, turtles, salamanders, newts, crayfish, muskrat, bull frogs, and redwing blackbirds.

Also, there is the insect and microscopic world including butterflies, dragonflies, pond skaters, water beetles, damselflies, tadpoles and various insect larve.

RECREATION AT THE PERKINS FARM

The Perkins Farm offers unparalleled recreational opportunities. Numerous soft recreational activities are possible. The gentle laying 266 acres consist streams, fields and forest, which provides the foundation.

Nature viewing: is first in line of the recreational activities. Attentive wildlife management has been geared not to just game animals. Equal consideration has been extended to increasing the numbers and diversity of species including neo-tropical songbirds, butterflies, turtles, frogs, rabbits, chipmunks, dragonflies, owls, hawks.

Stargazing-Planet Observation: Complete darkness can be still be found on most of the property, thereby affording the opportunity to view the night sky in all its brilliant wonder.

Shooting-sports devotees find all the land and privacy needed to enjoy:

  • Paintball-Airsoft-Laser Tag-Archery tag
  • Shotgun sport shooting including Skeet, Trap, Double Trap and Sporting Clays
  • Rifle & Handgun shooting: bullseye, silhouette, western, bench rest, long-range, fast draw
  • Archery and Crossbow competition shooting
  • Plain ole’ plinking: Grandpa’s old 22 single shot rifle and a few tin cans make a fun day

All Terrain Motorsports: The property has miles of farm roads and forest trails that are perfect for experiencing the property from an ATV or UTV. These exciting machines handle the wide variety of the farm’s terrain. The riders can go from down along the creej, wind through the pine and hardwood forest, across the fields and up to the highest ridges.

Dirt bikes can also be a lot of fun and they come in all sizes and horsepower to fit anyone who enjoys being on two wheels.

Mountain biking, horseback riding and hiking: The same trails used for Motorsports can also be used for mountain biking or horseback riding. The trails are designed to be on gentle grades but some trails coming off the ridges offer a more challenging climb.

Hunting at the Perkins Farm is a first-class experience. The lake and its attentive wetlands provide habitat for wood duck, geese and mallards. White tail deer, black bear, red/gray fox, bobcat, wild turkey, grouse, squirrel, raccoon, fox and rabbit make up the resident wildlife population. It is hard to find a property that has a better mix of wildlife as there has been attentive wildlife management for many years.

SELF-SUSTAINING LIFE OFF THE GRID

Just like 150 years ago, when the first mountaineers settled the area, the property would be self-sustaining in times of necessity – even without electricity.

  • Fresh water for drinking and cooking would come from springs and drilled water wells (hand drawing water from the wells using a cylinder well bucket).
  • The ponds and forest would provide fresh food (fish, deer, and turkey).
  • The agricultural land would be used to raise livestock, vegetable gardens, berry patches, fruit orchards, and row crops of corn, oats and barley.
  • Bee hives would provide honey and beeswax for candles.
  • The vast forest would provide firewood for heating and cooking, lumber for building, maple syrup and pounds of nuts (walnuts, beechnuts and hickory nuts).

FOREST FARMING

The most common crops are medicinal herbs and mushrooms. Other crops that can be produced include shade-loving native ornamentals, moss, fruit, nuts, other food crops, and decorative materials for crafts. These crops are often referred to as special forest products.

  • Here are some specific examples of crops in each category that are currently being cultivated: Medicinal herbs: Ginseng, goldenseal, black cohosh, bloodroot, passionflower, and mayapple
  • Mushrooms: Shiitake and oyster mushrooms. Native ornamentals: Rhododendrons and dogwood
  • Moss: Log or sheet moss
  • Fruit: Pawpaws, currants, elderberries, and lowbush blueberries
  • Nuts: Black walnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, and beechnuts
  • Other food crops: Ramps (wild leeks), maple syrup, and honey
  • Plants used for decorative purposes, dyes, and crafts: Galax, princess pine, white oak, pussy willow branches in the spring, holly, bittersweet, and bloodroot and ground pine (Lycopodium).

FOREST & TIMBER RESOURCES

The Perkins Farm’s 155+/- acre timber resource acreage is composed of unusually large and high quality Appalachian hardwoods. This well managed timber resource can provide a great deal of flexibility to the next ownership in terms of potential harvest revenue and can be managed to provide cash flow opportunities to offset holding cost and long-term asset appreciation.

Capital Timber Value of the timber and pulpwood has not been determined.

Species composition:
The forest’s predominately well-drained upland terrain has led to a resource dominated by hardwood species. Overall, the species composition is highly desirable and favors Appalachian hardwood types, consisting primarily of:

  • Black Cherry
  • Sugar Maple
  • Poplar/Basswood
  • Red Oak Group
  • White Oak/Chestnut Oak
  • Soft Maple
  • Hickory
  • Ash
  • A host of associate species (black walnut, birch, beech)

Stocking, Stem Quality, and Forest Structure:
Forest-wide, most stands are fully stocked, providing the next ownership with a great deal of flexibility in shaping their own silvicultural legacy. Stem quality forest-wide can be considered excellent with the forest containing an abundant current and future veneer source.

The property’s timber component has been well managed over the years and generally consists of two age classes that have been managed under even-aged silvicultural guidelines. The predominant timber stand contains 40-120-year-old stems ranging in size of 10”-36” dbh. Portions of this stand were thinned in 1952 and no commercial harvesting has taken place since then. Many sections of this stand are ready for a selective thinning which will generate considerable income.

The second distinct stand was established over the past 50 years when some of the farm fields and pastures were abandoned and the forest began to naturally regenerate. This stand represents a quality hardwood resource and will be reaching economic maturity in the next 20-40 years.

Diameters are well represented across the commercial spectrum with a notable mature size class, as well as abundant pole size timber and growing stock. Average diameter with all sawtimber products 12” dbh combined has not been determined.

Breakdown by diameter class measured 4.5 feet above the ground on the uphill side of the tree has not been determined.

Several “Heritage Trees” are scattered throughout the forest and field edges. These ancient trees, some 200-300 years old, have withstood the test of time, weathering ice, wind, lightning strikes and fire.

The forest is healthy and there are no signs of pest infestations of Gypsy Moth. The Emerald Ash Borer, which has inundated the entire Northeast US, is present and the Ash component will significantly decline over the next decade. The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid in present and the Eastern Hemlock will decline over the next decade. There have been no forest fires in the recent memory.

The forest floor is home to several types of mushrooms, medicinal plants, wild ginseng, ferns and cool green mosses. One could spend a lifetime getting to know this inviting environ.

WILDLIFE

The Perkins Farm is a wonderful wildlife sanctuary. The mixture of mature forest, emerging forest, grown over farm fields, old fruit trees, coupled with the abundant water supply from ponds and streams, create the perfect wildlife habitat. The “edge effect” created between, streams, farm fields and forest is the textbook habitat for the resident wildlife. The edges create long wildlife food plot.

White tail deer, black bear, red/gray fox, bobcat, wild turkey, grouse, black bear, coyote, squirrel, raccoon, fox and many species of songbirds, eagles, owls and hawks make up the resident wildlife population. It is hard to find a property that has a better mix of wildlife as there has been little hunting pressure for many years.

The hardwood forest provides the essential nutrient source and produces tons of hard mast including acorns, hickory nuts, beech nuts and black walnuts. Soft mast includes stag horn sumac, black cherry, tulip poplar and maple seeds, autumn olive berries and blackberries.

Several Bald Eagles have been spotted up and down the Greenbrier and New Rivers and are a thrill to see with wingspans of 6-7 feet.

The larger creeks and ephemeral branches are a major contributor to the local ecosystem richness and diversity for both plants and animals. The creeks and ponds and their surrounding aquatic plant life create a water supported community with a wide variety of wildlife. The ponds and some of creek margins are fringed by lowlands, and these lowlands support the aquatic food web, provide shelter for wildlife, and stabilize the banks. The plant life associated with the lowlands include, rushes, sedges, cattails, duckweed, bee balm and algae.

There are many animals that live around the edges of the creek, including raccoons, opossums, turtles, salamanders, newts, crayfish, muskrat, bull frogs, and redwing blackbirds. Of course, there is the insect and microscopic world including butterflies, dragonflies, water skaters, water beetles, damselflies, tadpoles and various insect larve.

MINERAL RESOURCES

West Virginia is one of the states in the US that has two ownership titles, those being SURFACE RIGHTS and MINERAL RIGHTS. The mineral rights are believed to be intact and all rights the owner has will convey with the property. A mineral title search could be conducted by a title attorney at the same time when the surface title search is being conducted.

BOUNDARIES AND SURVEY

There is a metes and bounds description of record for the property. Some of the boundary lines are evidenced by newer and older stock fencing and a creek. The property is being sold by the boundary and not by the acre.

UTILITIES

Water: A proven cold-water mountain spring supplies water to the home
Sewer: private septic
Electricity: Mon Power
LP Gas: Propane delivered by Southern State (Marlinton office)
Telephone: The home is wired with a landline phone system and is functioning
Internet: Possible Internet connection through the landline, satellite dish or cellular hotspots.
Cellphone Coverage good with 4G through specific providers in several places on the property
Trash Pickup: Local trash pickup available curbside

ACCESS/FRONTAGE

Starting from the paved state-maintained Leonard Long Road, the property is accessed by Roy Ray Road, a ½ mile long, graveled, historical easement crossing the adjoining Conrad Lane farm.

ZONING

The county is subject to some zoning and subdivision regulations. All prospective buyers should consult the County Commission and also the Health Department for details regarding zoning, building codes and installation of septic systems.
Information can be found at the county website: http://greenbriercounty.net/ordinances/

HUNTING CABIN

The “Hunting Cabin” is a 12×30 off grid lodge that currently is used for overnight stays and family/community cookouts. It has a dry sink and two outdoor comfort facilities. The cabin is located about a mile from the farm house.

FARM HOUSE & OUTBUILDINGS

  • 7-Room home
  • Exterior vinyl siding over the original poplar shiplap siding
  • Stone chimney and foundation
  • LP Gas Radiant Heater
  • Wood coal stove
  • Hardwood, Carpet, and Vinyl flooring
  • 3 Bedrooms,1 Bathroom, Kitchen, Dining, Living Room

Home Square Footage Summary
1300 SF +/- Main Floor
1100 SF +/- Upstairs
Total = 2,400 Square Feet +/-

Room Dimension Summary
1st Bedroom 15×15
2nd Bedroom 15×15
3rd Bedroom 15×15
Living Room 15×15
Dining room 15×15
Bathroom 6×13
Kitchen 8×18

Buildings
Equipment Shed
Woodworking Shop
Lower Barn
Upper Barn
Well House
Wood Shed
RV & ATV Shed

DEED AND TAX INFORMATION

Deed Information: DB 394 Pg. 800
Greenbrier County, West Virginia

Acreage: 266 acres and 63 poles (266.39 acres) +/-
Real Estate Tax ID/Acreage/Taxes:

Greenbrier County (13), West Virginia
Williamsburg District (18)

Tax Map 39 Parcel 29; Class 2; 2018 Real Estate Taxes $457.46

2018 Real Estate Taxes: $457.46

SCHOOLS

Greenbrier County School District

Public Elementary School:
Frankford Elementary School

Public Middle School:
Eastern Greenbrier Middle School

Public High School:
Greenbrier East High School

Colleges:
New River Community and Technical College (Lewisburg campus)
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

Private Schools:
Seneca Trail Christian Academy
Greenbrier Episcopal School
Lewisburg Baptist Academy

Home schooling is very popular in Greenbrier and surrounding counties

SURROUNDING AREA

Lewisburg, which is the Greenbrier County seat, was voted the Coolest Small Town in America, combines the warmth of a close community with the sophistication of more urban locations. The thriving downtown historic district boasts a year-round live theatre, a Carnegie Hall, distinctive dining venues, antique shops, art galleries, boutiques, and year-round, farmer’s markets.

A state-of-the-art public library was recently completed at a cost of some 3 million dollars.

The Greenbrier Valley Medical Center is a modern hospital with all attendant medical facilities. Orthodontic, dental facilities, dialysis center, rehabilitation centers, and skilled nursing care facilities are available as well.

Lewisburg is home to the WV Osteopathic Medical School (600 students) and the New River Community and Technical College. The area is a strong economic generator with a solid workforce employed in county/state government, tourism, hospitality, medical, education, retail, construction, wood products, mining and agriculture.

The world-renowned Greenbrier Resort, with 800 rooms and 1600 employees, is located nearby in the sleepy little town of White Sulphur Springs. The 4-Star resort has a subterranean casino and is home to the PGA tour. The Resort features an ever-expanding schedule of public events, including the underground gaming casino, a new $30 million training facility for professional football teams with their practice sessions open to the public. A 2500-seat tennis stadium to host professional and exhibition matches (The Williams sister, Pete Sampras, John McEnroe, etc recently played there).
The Greenbrier County Airport with WV’s longest runway provides daily flights to Chicago and Washington DC. A picturesque train ride from White Sulphur Springs connects the area to DC, , Chicago, and many other locations. By car, DC is 4 hours away and Charlotte is only 4.

Within 2 hours drive are located some of the finest recreational facilities in West Virginia: Snowshoe Ski Resort, Winterplace Ski Resort, the 2000 acre Bluestone Lake, Pipestem State Park and Resort, the 80,000 acre New River National Gorge National Park, whitewater rafting / fishing on the New River and Gauley Rivers, 12,000 acre BSA Summit (home to the US and World Jamboree). Five other area state parks and state forests offer unlimited hiking, horseback riding, ATV riding, and rock-climbing opportunities.

GREENBRIER RIVER

The Greenbrier River is 173 miles long is the last free flowing river east of the Mississippi. It is an excellent river to float or canoe and is well known for its large and small mouth bass fishing. It is the gateway to water recreation and fun as it is at most times lazy and easy to navigate.

The Greenbrier River is formed by the confluence of the East Fork Greenbrier River and the West Fork Greenbrier River in the town of Durbin, West Virginia. From Durbin the Greenbrier River flows southwesterly through Pocahontas, Greenbrier, Monroe, and Summers Counties. It flows through several communities including Cass, Marlinton, Hillsboro, Ronceverte, Fort Spring, Alderson, and Hinton. The Greenbrier River joins the New River in the town of Hinton, West Virginia.

THE REGION

The Perkins Farm lies in the heart of the Allegheny Mountains in the unspoiled southeastern region of West Virginia. The farm is surrounded by other mountain farms raising cattle, horses, goats and sheep. The densely forested woodland has a “patchwork quilt” network of wildlife openings, fields, food plots and trails.

The surrounding Allegheny Mountains provide a flawless backdrop for this 266-acre high elevation mountain farm. Winding forest trails offer hiking, horseback riding and ATV/off-roading adventure. Beyond the sheer beauty of the mature forest and fields, the peace and tranquility is seldom interrupted by manmade sounds.

Though home to fewer than 34,000 residents, Greenbrier county is among the largest in West Virginia and includes vast areas of forest, much of which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Monongahela National Forest and the Greenbrier State Forest.

REGIONAL INFORMATION

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Contact Foxfire

Telephone

304.645.7674

Scroll To Top